H O M E
JAPANESE LONGTAILS:

ONAGADORI
SHOKOKU
OHIKI
MINOHIKI
TOTENKO
KUROKASHIWA
SATSUMADORI

CHINESE LONGTAILS

KOREAN LONGTAILS

EUROPEAN LONGTAILS
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
PHOENIX
YOKOHAMA
YOKOHAMA (UK)

SUMATRA - diverse

BREEDING LONGTAILS
NEW DEVELOPMENTS
BIRDS OF CASA ROCCA
WORLD WIDE CONTACTS

LONGCROWERS:
KOEYOSHI
TOTENKO
DENIZLI
TOMARU
BERGISCHE KRAEHER
YURLOWER
BERAT
KOSOVA / DRENICA

OTHER BREEDS:

CEMANI
SHAMO
KO-SHAMO
CHIBI
YAMATO GUNKEI
KINPA
NANKIN SHAMO
YAKIDO
Contact
 


Birds of Casa Rocca

Some birds we have and have had



• The content of this page will be changing as I get time to update it. We no longer have some of these breeds listed here. I will now be devoting my time to large fowl black and blue Phoenix. Please check back often to see the latest additions to our flock!


 

But where to put them all?
Our main coop is a rather small house with three voliere, each divided. In the breeding season, almost up until placing the rings on the birds, it gets a bit crowded. Chicken housing can be rather simple, as long as they have fresh air without drafts, lot of light and, if they are to be housed, enough moving room. This is an extremely important factor if one wants to have birds in show condition. If the strain of Phoenix or Yokohama has exceptionally long tails, one should consider having a stall per rooster! My personal preference is a tail at about three to three and a half feet (100 - 120 cm), and feathers a little harder than many Phoenix and Onagadori X Phoenix lines. The harder the feather, the more resistant it has been to wear and tear - because I like to have my birds roaming free through the fields, woods and small pastures around our house.

 

 

The beginning - an old pig stall.

This is my little seven year-old - an Ohiki enthusiast! - helping out with the construction of a chicken coop. (See next pic below left.)

We added height and a new roof, placing 200 year-old tiles that we dug up on the porperty, on top of new corregated eternite sheets. Three large cages were constructed around it. It is on the north side of the house, so protection and some heating in winter is necessary.

A crowded moment in the breeding season. In my work with the Black Phoenix (see below left), I have crossed different white Phoenix lines with my Blacks in order to improve the sickles and, most importantly, the saddles. To me, a top-class Phoenix MUST have saddle that touch the ground - or miss it by millimetres! Here one can see the effect of dominant white (as in Leghorn) when crossed with black. The splashed and dirty white birds in this shot are from such crosses.

 

My line of Black Phoenix. Still MUCH work to do. This superb cock (below right) has given me some great offspring but none as good as he before he left us forever..... common story. One should breed like the commerical breeders with thousands of birds in order to make quick progress... the old way with 10's and 20's of chicks a year takes a half a lifetime!




A new and incredible aquisition for us: Rolf Ismer Line of Black Breasted Phoenix (above) with all of the qualities dreamt of: superb health and yet sweet-natured and tame, excellent leg length and tight underbelly, raised wing carriage, multiple feathering in the main sickles, hard feather structure, full (but not as spectacular saddles), superb small combs and elegant neck form. A dream come true. I am now using this line to better my whites which have gigantic size (Erhard Schubert line) AND spectacular saddles.


The "Bachelor's Apartments" - an old dog pen, converted into a coop. My new colours: SPLASH (in back) and BLACK (front) with whites from Erhardt Schubert of East German breeding lines.

This is a corner of the greenhouse coop (above) with our small flock of OHIKI. We are not allowed to build a solid structure becasue we live so close to the Natural Park of Rocchetta Tanaro, so I made a nine compartment coop in the form of a fiberglass greenhouse. It serves the purpose well, but extra care has to be taken to ventilate and shade the house in the summer.


Most of the year my birds roam the fields and edge of the woods right behind the house. When the foxes are rearing their young we have to close them all up, as I have lost up to seven birds in one day.

 

My son also has Shamos. Please click here to see other shots of ours and others' SHAMOS.

 

 


     

 


 

 
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