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JAPANESE LONGTAILS:

ONAGADORI
SHOKOKU
OHIKI
MINOHIKI
TOTENKO
KUROKASHIWA
SATSUMADORI

CHINESE LONGTAILS

KOREAN LONGTAILS

EUROPEAN LONGTAILS
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
PHOENIX
YOKOHAMA
YOKOHAMA (UK)

SUMATRA - diverse

BREEDING LONGTAILS
NEW DEVELOPMENTS
BIRDS OF CASA ROCCA
WORLD WIDE CONTACTS

LONGCROWERS:
KOEYOSHI
TOTENKO
DENIZLI
TOMARU
BERGISCHE KRAEHER
YURLOWER
BERAT
KOSOVA / DRENICA

OTHER BREEDS:

CEMANI
SHAMO
KO-SHAMO
CHIBI
YAMATO GUNKEI
KINPA
NANKIN SHAMO
YAKIDO
Contact
 

 

The TOTENKO - The Long-Tailed Longcrower 東天紅鶏
(Sometimes written: Tohtenkoh or Toutenkou)
A magnificent masterpiece of animal breeding!

 


 


Photo above courtesy of Julia Keeling, Secretary - Asian Hardfeather Club.


The TOTENKO, a member of the long-crowing group along with the Kurokashiwa, the Tomaru and the Koyeoshi, should not be confused with the German Phoenix, with which it has many similarities (white earlobes, long feathers).

 

Two distinguishing factors between the TOTENKO and the PHOENIX are its olive green legs and its open, rather than tightly closed tail as in the PHOENIX. Another differenciating factor is the carriage and body, which are lighter and more delicate in structure than the Phoenix. It was denied recognition in Germany for the past few years because the characteristics of the Phoenix were too similar. Now that the Phoenix must have slate legs, the TOTENKO will be accepted as a Japanese purebred.

 

There are perhaps ten breeders of the TOTENKO in Germany. I know of two of us in in Italy, one in England, but none in America or Holland. If this bird were to come into the hands of the exhibition minded Longtail Fowl breeders, the danger exists that the visual show points would predominate in the selection process and that the long-crowing qualities would diminish. This story has already happened to other breeds such as the Bergische Kraeher.


If you breed Totenko, ALWAYS REMEMBER that it is primarily a longcrower and secondarily a longtail! The voice can be lost rather quickly if outcrossed to other breeds. The most important factor in breeding this delicate breed is to network with other breeders and exchange animals when fresh blood is necessary.

The TOTENKO is extremely rare and yet it is a spectacularly beautiful and its crow is a song unto itself. Thos who wish to breed this and many of the other Japanese breeds must be prepared to dedicate time and effort, as these breeds are not of the strong nature of many of our European breeds. The Totenko, as well as the other newly-imported ornamentals (the Shamo, Ko-Shamo, Chibi being hardy exceptions) are very sensitive to bacterial and viral infections of our Western World. Be prepared especially with coccidiose medications while young, as many can die suddenly from this rather common bacterial infection.

Within the past four to five years many of my German colleagues, however, have been able to ascertain greater increasing hardiness in their diverse lines (Koeyoshi, Minohiki and Totenko being exceptionally delicate). With dedication, these lines are already becoming stronger.



Japanese Standard for Totenko - sent to me by Julia Keeling, Secretary - Asian Hardfeather Club.

 

TOTENKO

Single comb, white earlobe, red brown eye colour

Weight: cock 2250g, hen 1800g (young birds 1350 1600g)

Red hackled (Black Breasted Red)

Long tail has 30 angle in cocks, 20 angle in hens

 

Click below to hear an audio file of an exceptional Totenko rooster!


Photo above left courtesy of Julia Keeling, Secretary - Asian Hardfeather Club.

 

Post Script by Julia Keeling:


"I would just like to say that although I keep reading about how fragile this breed is, I have never found it to be so myself, nor was it in Japan! What I would say though, is that the breed does not appear to do at all well, or breed successfully, if caged. My own flock are very hardy indeed, but are allowed to free-range and roost in an open shelter. They forage so successfully that they require minimal extra food. They lay prolifically and breed so successfully I must constantly cull surplus chicks emerging from hedges and sheds. So, although it is not the breed for for those with limited space (or with neighbours!), it is certainly not delicate if kept in the right conditions."

 



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