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JAPANESE LONGTAILS:

ONAGADORI
SHOKOKU
OHIKI
MINOHIKI
TOTENKO
KUROKASHIWA
SATSUMADORI

CHINESE LONGTAILS

KOREAN LONGTAILS

EUROPEAN LONGTAILS
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
PHOENIX
YOKOHAMA
YOKOHAMA (UK)

SUMATRA - diverse

BREEDING LONGTAILS
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LONGCROWERS:
KOEYOSHI
TOTENKO
DENIZLI
TOMARU
BERGISCHE KRAEHER
YURLOWER
BERAT
KOSOVA / DRENICA

OTHER BREEDS:

CEMANI
SHAMO
KO-SHAMO
CHIBI
YAMATO GUNKEI
KINPA
NANKIN SHAMO
YAKIDO
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YAMATO GUNKEI 大和軍鶏

A jealously guarded specimen of exaggeration



 

Firstly, names need to be explained, as they can be confusing. Although not a translation of the word, “Shamo” can be understood to mean “Game bird from Japan”. Therefore Ko Shamo means miniature game, not miniature version of the large fowl. Nankin Shamo means Game bird from Nankin. [The Japanese characters for “Shamo” can also be translated as “Gunkei”, hence the strange name of this game bird.]

 

Text below by Julia Keeling, Asian Hardfeather Club Secretary.


The Yamato Gunkei is an in-between size of oriental Gamefowl from the 1.3kg (2.86 Lb) pullet to the 2kg (4.4 LB) adult cock. Although it has the Chibi Shamo as a smaller version, it is nevertheless usually also considered to be, and shown as, a bantam Shamo breed (a totally different breed from the Ko Shamo). The most important attribute of this breed is "exaggeration." When adult it has a massive frame, strong chunky legs and feet, and a large head with pendulous dewlap and very wrinkled skin, which gets more wrinkled and grotesque with age. Colour of plumage is not important, but it must be hard and sparse with bare red skin showing at throat, point of wing, down the keel and around the vent. The wings are held away from the body at the shoulders, and the shoulder coverts should show clearly on the back, giving the characteristic "five hills" as seen from the back: wing / shoulder coverts / back / shoulder coverts / wing.

 

The "prawn" tail is short and should point down and inwards between the legs. The females are not usually as exaggerated as the males, but in both sexes the aim is for as much exaggeration as possible within the weight limits. Very rarely seen in the British Isles, the breed is in very few hands even on the Continent. It seems that birds or eggs are difficult to obtain, even from Japan where, although they have specialist shows for small Shamo breeds, stock is jealously guarded.

 

A superb gallery with very good photographs of this exceptional breed can be seen at the yamato-gunkei.de site.

 

Photo below left courtesy of Julia Keeling, Secretary - Asian Hardfeather Club.

Photo below courtesy of Julia Keeling, Secretary - Asian Hardfeather Club.

 


 

 
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